Princess 'Gives Up Her Royal Status To Marry A 'Beach Tourism' Worker

Princess 'Gives Up Her Royal Status To Marry A 'Beach Tourism' Worker Princess Mako

A Japanese princess will give up her royal status when she marries a beach tourism worker she met in a restaurant. 

Princess Mako, the granddaughter of Japan's emperor, is getting married to ocean lover Kei Komuro who can ski, play the violin and cook, it has been claimed. 


The man who won the princess' heart, was a fellow student at International Christian University in Tokyo, where Princess Mako, 25, also graduated. 

Once they say 'I do', she will lose her status - despite being Emperor Akihito's granddaughter - as Japanese tradition dictates and become a commoner. 

Japan's Princess Mako stands on a bulletproofed balcony at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo to greet well-wishers who throng to the palace compound to celebrate Emperor Akihito's 78th birthday

Japan's Princess Mako stands on a bulletproofed balcony at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo to greet well-wishers who throng to the palace compound to celebrate Emperor Akihito's 78th birthday

 

Japan's Princess Mako, the first daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, poses for photos at Imperial Palace in Tokyo

Japan's Princess Mako, the first daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, poses for photos at Imperial Palace in Tokyo

Princess Mako of Akishino of Japan attends the official draw ceremony ahead of the World Group Davis Cup tie between Japan and France at Ariake ColosseumJapan's Princess Mako, the first daughter of Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, poses for photos at Imperial Palace in Tokyo

Princess Mako of Akishino of Japan attends the official draw ceremony ahead of the World Group Davis Cup tie between Japan and France at Ariake Colosseum (left) and poses for photographs outside the Imperial Palace in Tokyo (right)

They met at a restaurant in Tokyo's Shibuya about five years ago at a party to talk about studying abroad, and have been seeing more of each other in recent months. 

Komuro has worked as 'Prince of the Sea' to promote tourism to the beaches of Shonan in Kanagawa prefecture, a report on public broadcaster NHK said.

Women can't succeed to the Chrysanthemum Throne in Japan. 

Mako's father and her younger brother are in line to succeed Emperor Akihito, but after her uncle Crown Prince Naruhito, who is first in line.

Mako of Akishino attends the state dinner in honour of King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium +9

Mako of Akishino attends the state dinner in honour of King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium

Once she marries, Mako will no longer be a princess and will become a commoner.

But the process building up to the wedding is likely to take some time and be full of ritual, as Japanese nuptials, especially royal ones, tend to be.

 

 

 

Tagged as:

Social Issues, Princess Mako, Kei Komuro, International Christian Universit