New Mexico Coffee Roaster Spearheads Ethiopian Water Project

New Mexico Coffee Roaster Spearheads Ethiopian Water Project Ethiopian workers wash coffee fruit to quickly remove the beans. Washed coffee is causing clean water problems in Ethiopia, so Prosum Roasters of Albuquerque is working with the New Mexico Coffee Association to raise money for a pipeline project.

The Clean Water Project is an ongoing initiative aimed at building a water pipeline in the Ethiopian village of Kellensoo, where Prosum Roasters gets its Ethiopian beans

By Taylor Hood (Albuquerque Journal) |

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.―Prosum is Latin for “do good; be a benefit; useful.” Albuquerque coffee wholesaler Prosum Roasters is trying to live up to its name.

That’s why it is teaming with the New Mexico Coffee Association to benefit the Clean Water Project, an initiative aimed at building a water pipeline in the Ethiopian village of Kellensoo, where Prosum gets its Ethiopian beans. The pipeline will bring fresh water to local farmers and families from tanks that are located uphill from the village coffee harvesting facility.

The fundraising event begins at 6 p.m. today at Winning Coffee Co. on Harvard and Central, where the coffee association will sell T-shirts. All profits will go to the pipeline.

The T-shirt sales will continue Friday at Prosum, Piñon Coffee House and Satelite Coffee outlets. Winning Coffee will also accept donations, and Piñon plans to donate 10 percent of all sales that day to the project.

Prosum already gives a percentage of its sales to help the village. The Clean Water Project is ongoing, with water purification efforts planned for the future, and it will be funded entirely through donations and fundraising, Prosum owner Cindy Moffitt said.

A cost estimate for the pipeline is not available yet, because Ethiopian partners are still in the mapping and planning stages.

Kellensoo is a small village, but it contains a crucial fixture; a coffee harvesting plant. The plant processes the coffee fruit, which contains the beans, in two ways: natural or dry processing, which is cleaner but more time-consuming, or a method involving “washing” in which water is used to ferment the fruit so the husk is easily peeled away. The water and debris are then dumped back into the ground.

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